Scholarship and the Clinical Educator In 1998, after a number of years in university administration, I re-joined my department of communication sciences and disorders and found myself involved in discussions with clinical education colleagues—both at the University of Maine and elsewhere—about their scholarly interests. The discussions revolved around what constitutes scholarship as well as ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2001
Scholarship and the Clinical Educator
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marisue Pickering
    University of Maine, Orono, ME
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2001
Scholarship and the Clinical Educator
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2001, Vol. 11, 11-15. doi:10.1044/aas11.1.11
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2001, Vol. 11, 11-15. doi:10.1044/aas11.1.11
In 1998, after a number of years in university administration, I re-joined my department of communication sciences and disorders and found myself involved in discussions with clinical education colleagues—both at the University of Maine and elsewhere—about their scholarly interests. The discussions revolved around what constitutes scholarship as well as what clinical educators have to offer to scholarly discourse. These discussions also brought to my awareness that the traditional terms of clinical supervisor and clinical supervision (e.g., see Anderson, 1988; Crago & Pickering, 1987) are being replaced with clinical educator and clinical education, nomenclature common in other countries. (For example, see the work of Australian speech-language pathologist McAllister, in press.) This change in language relates to the topic of clinical educators’ scholarly interests. Terms help define how professionals perceive themselves and how they are perceived. Acceptance of the term educator can help clinical educators position themselves within the academic enterprise with its implicit and explicit expectations about teaching, research, and service. Perhaps both clinical education and tenure track faculty can enhance their understanding of the scholarly contributions clinical educators can and do make.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.