Outcomes Measurement and Management: Staff’s Outcomes: Satisfaction and Retention In today’s health care environment patient outcomes is the focus of many organizational initiatives. Increasing quality of patient care and functional outcomes, while minimizing cost and decreasing unnecessary services, are salient attributes of successful service provision. Staff satisfaction, retention, and professional development are critical to accomplish these goals. One ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2001
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Staff’s Outcomes: Satisfaction and Retention
Author Notes
  • Carmen Vega-BarachowitzColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   March 01, 2001
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Staff’s Outcomes: Satisfaction and Retention
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2001, Vol. 11, 16-18. doi:10.1044/aas11.1.16
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2001, Vol. 11, 16-18. doi:10.1044/aas11.1.16
In today’s health care environment patient outcomes is the focus of many organizational initiatives. Increasing quality of patient care and functional outcomes, while minimizing cost and decreasing unnecessary services, are salient attributes of successful service provision. Staff satisfaction, retention, and professional development are critical to accomplish these goals. One of our biggest challenges as leaders, administrators, managers, and supervisors within an organization is to create an environment where clinicians feel engaged and supported (Erickson, 2001). We want our staff to be highly competent, maintaining current knowledge and skills. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) (2000)  and other regulatory agencies have established guidelines and regulations to ensure staff education and competencies. JCAHO requires that all health system departments develop and implement at least three areas of competency assessment that must be assessed annually. In addition, JCAHO specifies the need for the assessment of age specific competencies with respect to the chronological age, developmental age, and social maturity of the patients they serve (The Greeley Education Company, 1999). Ensuring that staff is competent, however, does not guarantee staff satisfaction and retention. Instead, I believe fostering professional development through mentoring can lead us to achieve these goals.
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