Clinical Ethics As supervisors and administrators, we are faced with ethical dilemmas on a daily basis. The insurance company that sets patient treatment days, the therapist that struggles with productivity expectations, and the patient/family dealing with a life-changing illness, each present a multifaceted situation that requires careful consideration if an acceptable ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2001
Clinical Ethics
Author Notes
  • Andrea RussellColumn Editor
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2001
Clinical Ethics
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2001, Vol. 11, 20. doi:10.1044/aas11.1.20
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2001, Vol. 11, 20. doi:10.1044/aas11.1.20
As supervisors and administrators, we are faced with ethical dilemmas on a daily basis. The insurance company that sets patient treatment days, the therapist that struggles with productivity expectations, and the patient/family dealing with a life-changing illness, each present a multifaceted situation that requires careful consideration if an acceptable solution is to be reached. Supervisors and administrators play key roles in the resolution of these ethical challenges. Over the next year, I hope to provide columns that will assist you with these issues. My name is Andi Russell, and I have agreed to serve as coordinator for the newsletter’s ethics column. My career in speech-language pathology has been spent caring for patients in the adult neurorehabilitation arena. I have served as director of a small speech-language pathology department and last year I accepted a position as coordinator of inpatient and acute rehabilitation services at Floyd Medical Center, where I have worked for the past 7 years. This new position has provided many learning opportunities in the area of ethics as well as interpersonal communication. Our inpatient rehabilitation unit will begin payment under the prospective payment system (PPS) in July 2001 and this will again provide opportunities for learning from the standpoint of ethics and provision of quality care. As a new leader, I am learning that there are multiple sources to which I can turn when researching an ethical issue. ASHA, the Commission for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) each provide codes of ethics or annual standards manuals for members with an emphasis on ethical conduct and patient rights. As a profession we also have a great resource in our colleagues. Through the use of e-mail lists, education courses, and meetings, we can learn new methods of practice from one another. I am hopeful that through this column we can share new ways for dealing with ethical issues, and I look forward to hearing from you regarding the issues you face and the various methods you use to deal with the situations that arise. If you have an issue that you would like to see discussed in this column, or if you would be interested in writing a column on the topic of ethics, please contact me at 706-802-2668 or by e-mail at arussell@floydmed.org. I hope to hear from you.
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