Supervision: Developing a Course in Supervision at the Graduate Level With all the coursework that is already required to complete a master’s degree, adding a course in supervision may seem, to some, to be less critical than adding other areas of coursework that on first blush appear to be of higher clinical relevance. Nevertheless, supervision is an activity that ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2001
Supervision: Developing a Course in Supervision at the Graduate Level
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shelley Victor
    Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL
  • Nancy LefkowitzColumn Editor
Article Information
Supervision
Article   |   March 01, 2001
Supervision: Developing a Course in Supervision at the Graduate Level
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2001, Vol. 11, 4-5. doi:10.1044/aas11.1.4
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2001, Vol. 11, 4-5. doi:10.1044/aas11.1.4
With all the coursework that is already required to complete a master’s degree, adding a course in supervision may seem, to some, to be less critical than adding other areas of coursework that on first blush appear to be of higher clinical relevance. Nevertheless, supervision is an activity that we all engage in either as a supervisee or supervisor. Unfortunately, the academic training in this area, which directly affects the growth of students as they move through their clinical education and training, is lacking in most curricula.
At Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, FL, master’s students may elect to take a supervision course as part of their required 9 credits of electives. A supervision course is a requirement for all speech-language pathology doctoral students. At the master’s level, students learn the principles of the supervisory process and can apply these directly in their role as supervisees. The information disseminated also prepares them to be future supervisors. As a consequence of the course, students acquire the skills necessary to achieve effective supervision. There is some overlap of information in the courses due to the fact that many of the doctoral students lack academic coursework in the area of clinical supervision. The greatest differences in the two courses is the depth of information provided at the doctoral level, as compared to the master’s level, the breadth of literature required, and the type and expected level of sophistication of course assignments at the differing graduate levels.
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