Assistants: It Takes a Nation: Part III: Training and Supervising Speech-Language Pathology Assistants: The Arizona Territory, The Michigan Position, and New Horizons This article continues a series introduced in the October 2001, then continued in the March 2002, newsletter issue about innovative curricula for the education of speech-language pathology assistants. Earlier, we overviewed the evolution of the Arizona licensure laws with respect to assistants and the issues related to the interpretation ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2002
Assistants: It Takes a Nation: Part III: Training and Supervising Speech-Language Pathology Assistants: The Arizona Territory, The Michigan Position, and New Horizons
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeanne M. Mullins
    Cape Fear Community College, Wilmington, NC
  • Kathleen Moore
    Scottsdale Community College, Scottsdale, AZ
  • Rhonda Kraai
    Baker College, Muskegon, MI
  • Linda Wortman-Lowe
    Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute, Caldwell, NC
  • Jeanne MullinsColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Assistants
Article   |   June 01, 2002
Assistants: It Takes a Nation: Part III: Training and Supervising Speech-Language Pathology Assistants: The Arizona Territory, The Michigan Position, and New Horizons
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2002, Vol. 12, 11-12. doi:10.1044/aas12.2.11
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2002, Vol. 12, 11-12. doi:10.1044/aas12.2.11
This article continues a series introduced in the October 2001, then continued in the March 2002, newsletter issue about innovative curricula for the education of speech-language pathology assistants. Earlier, we overviewed the evolution of the Arizona licensure laws with respect to assistants and the issues related to the interpretation of what it means to practice speech-language pathology. Now, we continue with a discussion of conditions in Michigan and conclude with our ideas for future directions.
“One doesn’t discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time” (Gide, 1927, p. 353). In the spirit of this comment, the speech-language pathology assistant movement in Michigan has been a pioneer in uncharted territory. Although Baker College in Muskegon had the distinction of being the first program in the nation to graduate speech-language pathology assistants with an associate degree, the institution still sits afloat on Lake Michigan waiting for rations, appropriations, and support.
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