Audiology Issues: Competency-Based Audiology Clinical Training Program In 1996, the ASHA Subcommittee on Issues in Clinical Supervision reported that graduate training programs want to develop innovative ways to teach the knowledge and skills necessary for contemporary professional practice. Also, better methods for measuring student learning and clinical competency are needed. Responses from graduate training programs across ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2002
Audiology Issues: Competency-Based Audiology Clinical Training Program
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martha Wilder Paxton
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Rose AllenColumn Editor
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Audiology Issues
Article   |   June 01, 2002
Audiology Issues: Competency-Based Audiology Clinical Training Program
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2002, Vol. 12, 3-5. doi:10.1044/aas12.2.3
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2002, Vol. 12, 3-5. doi:10.1044/aas12.2.3
In 1996, the ASHA Subcommittee on Issues in Clinical Supervision reported that graduate training programs want to develop innovative ways to teach the knowledge and skills necessary for contemporary professional practice. Also, better methods for measuring student learning and clinical competency are needed. Responses from graduate training programs across America and Canada indicated a variety of models and methods are being used for clinical training, including a “teaching-practice-application” model, computer-based skill development, distance learning methods, problem-based learning model, journal writing method, video observation and recording method, and team supervision model. The audiology graduate training program at Auburn University in Auburn, AL, has utilized a progressive, competency-based model for almost 20 years to teach specific tasks and clinical skills. This program emphasizes critical thinking skills, problem-solving techniques, and appropriate patient management throughout a student’s clinical experience. This model, which includes a weekly class, daily practicum, and four seminars offered in successive semesters, provides a means to teach students required skills and to assess their progress.
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