Supervision: Emotional Intelligence: A Tool for Improving Managerial Skills and Team Functioning Many years ago I attended a lecture in which the speaker asserted that IQ is not the determining factor for success. The speaker contrasted the histories of two individuals, both promoted to managerial positions. One person, technically brilliant, alienated supervisors and peers and was ultimately fired. The other, technically ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
Supervision: Emotional Intelligence: A Tool for Improving Managerial Skills and Team Functioning
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine Ledwon-Robinson
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Health Care Systems Division, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Nancy LefkowitzColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Supervision
Article   |   October 01, 2002
Supervision: Emotional Intelligence: A Tool for Improving Managerial Skills and Team Functioning
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2002, Vol. 12, 17-20. doi:10.1044/aas12.3.17
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2002, Vol. 12, 17-20. doi:10.1044/aas12.3.17
Many years ago I attended a lecture in which the speaker asserted that IQ is not the determining factor for success. The speaker contrasted the histories of two individuals, both promoted to managerial positions. One person, technically brilliant, alienated supervisors and peers and was ultimately fired. The other, technically competent but not outstandingly brilliant, worked effectively with others and led a high-functioning team. This individual was repeatedly promoted and eventually assumed an executive-level po-sition. The difference between these leaders was attributed to“emotional intelligence,” a concept new to me. Though the concept was intriguing, I did not think more about emotional intelligence until a “perfect storm” of leadership issues confronted me. The interdisciplinary team I led was experiencing difficulty working together effectively, in part because of contrasting personality styles and ineffective interpersonal communication skills. In addition, I had been asked to combine two administratively distinct Speech-Language Pathology Departments, a merger actively opposed by some members. The relationship between the two groups was conflicted, jeopardizing my goal of developing an integrated and effective department. I decided to explore the topic of emotional intelligence (EI). The more I learned about EI, the more it appeared to be a useful tool for my own growth as a manager, as well as for staff development. In this article, I will briefly review the definition of emotional intelligence and will then describe how I used the principles of EI to improve team functioning and staff skill development.
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