Ethics: An Overview for Clinicians In the previous ethics column, Professional Ethics: An Overview for Student Clinicians, I overviewed a series of procedures that clinical educators in academic institutions can implement to enhance the ethics dimension of clinical education (Gunter, 2002). Because the ASHA Code of Ethics, in Principle II, Rule C, mandates that ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
Ethics: An Overview for Clinicians
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cheryl D. Gunter
    Department of Communicative Disorders, West Chester University, West Chester, PA
  • Andi RussellColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Ethics
Article   |   October 01, 2002
Ethics: An Overview for Clinicians
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2002, Vol. 12, 9-11. doi:10.1044/aas12.3.9
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2002, Vol. 12, 9-11. doi:10.1044/aas12.3.9
In the previous ethics column, Professional Ethics: An Overview for Student Clinicians, I overviewed a series of procedures that clinical educators in academic institutions can implement to enhance the ethics dimension of clinical education (Gunter, 2002). Because the ASHA Code of Ethics, in Principle II, Rule C, mandates that individuals continue their professional development across their careers, the ethics dimension of clinical practice must pervade the continued professional education experiences in which clinicians participate (ASHA, 2001). Clinicians across medical, rehabilitation, educational, and other clinical practice sites encounter a diverse assortment of situations that call into question the interpretation and application of ethical principles. To demonstrate their paramount concern for the welfare of their clients and, in turn, to maintain the public trust placed in clinicians from clients or potential clients and the respect earned from the contributions of the discipline of communication sciences and disorders, clinicians must continue to hold ethics considerations at the forefront of clinical practice. In this ethics column, I overview two specific procedures that facilitators of professional education seminars and inservice events can adapt to enhance clinicians’ conscious attention to and application of professional ethics.
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