Technology: The Role of Technology in the Retention of Professionals Who Are Blind Before a return to the private sector, I served in the public sector for 12 years as a Technology Specialist for a state Department for the Blind in the Midwest. In that role, I worked with individuals who became blind earlier in their lives in their quest to enter ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2003
Technology: The Role of Technology in the Retention of Professionals Who Are Blind
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul A. Rabe
    Touch-Pro Computer Consultants, Aston, PA
  • Michael WynneColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Technology
Article   |   March 01, 2003
Technology: The Role of Technology in the Retention of Professionals Who Are Blind
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2003, Vol. 13, 20-23. doi:10.1044/aas13.1.20
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2003, Vol. 13, 20-23. doi:10.1044/aas13.1.20
Before a return to the private sector, I served in the public sector for 12 years as a Technology Specialist for a state Department for the Blind in the Midwest. In that role, I worked with individuals who became blind earlier in their lives in their quest to enter their chosen professions, as well as with individuals who experienced an onset of blindness later in their lives who wished to retain their current positions. In either case, in the course of consultation, one of the central issues I addressed was whether technology could enhance the accessibility of a position so that an individual could pursue his or her preferred vocation. Some queries about whether technology could open (or hold open) career doors came from individuals in communication sciences and disorders. The issue of whether individuals who are blind can easily earn entry-level credentials in the field has been raised in various contexts and will not be the focus here. However, an even more likely issue that could arise is whether professionals who have practiced for some time, who then become blind, can preserve their positions, retain their competence, and, thus, continue to contribute their experience and expertise to research, administration, instruction, and/or service provision. Because of that, this column focus on the needs of administrators in academic and clinical work sites.
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