The Evaluation of Critical Thinking Skills in Clinical Practicum Students Critical thinking, according to Paul and Elder (2000), is a process of continuous improvement in one’s quality of thinking about problems. According to Crist (2001), a critical thinker will raise relevant, precise questions, demonstrating the use of past experience blended with knowledge; analyze and interpret experiences from the assessment ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2003
The Evaluation of Critical Thinking Skills in Clinical Practicum Students
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph B. Lejeune
    Genesis Rehabilitation Services, Kennett Square, PA
  • Cheryl D. Gunter
    Department of Communicative Disorders, West Chester University, West Chester, PA
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2003
The Evaluation of Critical Thinking Skills in Clinical Practicum Students
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2003, Vol. 13, 23-25. doi:10.1044/aas13.1.23
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2003, Vol. 13, 23-25. doi:10.1044/aas13.1.23
Critical thinking, according to Paul and Elder (2000), is a process of continuous improvement in one’s quality of thinking about problems. According to Crist (2001), a critical thinker will raise relevant, precise questions, demonstrating the use of past experience blended with knowledge; analyze and interpret experiences from the assessment of relevant information; provide reasoned conclusions and recommendations based on frames of reference and standards for professional performance; modify thinking based on practical implications that demonstrate self-correction of thinking in atypical or unique situations; and communicate effectively with others in negotiating complex problems.
ASHA has recognized the vital importance of critical thinking in clinical education, as seen in the revised speech-language pathology standards to be implemented in 2005. These standards include provisions for both formative and summative assessment, which must evaluate critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. Facione and Facione (1994)  noted that a good critical thinker engages in analysis, interpretation, evaluation, inference, explanation, and metacognitive self-regulation and included systematicity, reasoning self-confidence, cognitive maturity, analyticity, and inquisitiveness as other critical thinking skills.
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