Audiology: Teamwork Revisited: Are You Ready for Virtual Teams? Professionals in audiology and speech-language pathology are frequently asked to serve as members or to assume leadership roles on various specialized teams. Examples of such teams that often exist in the profession include interdisciplinary assessment and/or treatment teams, research teams, teams assembled for purposes of grant development, quality assurance ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2003
Audiology: Teamwork Revisited: Are You Ready for Virtual Teams?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rose L. Allen
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, School of Allied Health Sciences, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Lauren R. Smith
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, School of Allied Health Sciences, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Michael P. Rastatter
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, School of Allied Health Sciences, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Rose AllenColumn Editor
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Audiology
Article   |   March 01, 2003
Audiology: Teamwork Revisited: Are You Ready for Virtual Teams?
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2003, Vol. 13, 6-9. doi:10.1044/aas13.1.6
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2003, Vol. 13, 6-9. doi:10.1044/aas13.1.6
Professionals in audiology and speech-language pathology are frequently asked to serve as members or to assume leadership roles on various specialized teams. Examples of such teams that often exist in the profession include interdisciplinary assessment and/or treatment teams, research teams, teams assembled for purposes of grant development, quality assurance teams, and, now, virtual teams. According to Merriam-Webster (2003), a team consists of a number of persons who are associated with one another for work-related functions or for participation in group activities. Teamwork constitutes a unified effort of its members or associates for the completion of a given task, requiring a subordination of personal, individual prominence for the efficiency of the whole or group. Although the team concept may appear to be an efficient mechanism for meeting or obtaining the desired result, certain challenges often exist for the individual assuming the role as team leader. Such challenges include assuring a satisfactory solution to the task at hand, completing all the necessary steps or operations by an acceptable deadline, and, often most importantly, preserving the “welfare” of each individual constituting the group. Team leaders must possess a number of skills in order to achieve success and to lead teams in a most efficient and effective manner.
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