Outcomes Measurement and Management: Predictors of Treatment Outcomes from Consistent Versus Variable Substitution Patterns Based on recent research, variability and consistency of a child’s substitution patterns may be indicators of how well a child will learn and generalize a treated sound to other word positions. According to Forrest, Elbert, and Dinnsen (1999), consistent substitution (CS) involves the same sound substitution in all word ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2003
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Predictors of Treatment Outcomes from Consistent Versus Variable Substitution Patterns
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cami Huff
    Department of Communicative Disorders, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN
  • Beth King
    Department of Communicative Disorders, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN
  • A. Lynn Williams
    Department of Communicative Disorders, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN
  • Carmen Vega-BarachowitzColumn Editor
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   June 01, 2003
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Predictors of Treatment Outcomes from Consistent Versus Variable Substitution Patterns
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2003, Vol. 13, 8-9. doi:10.1044/aas13.2.8
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2003, Vol. 13, 8-9. doi:10.1044/aas13.2.8
Based on recent research, variability and consistency of a child’s substitution patterns may be indicators of how well a child will learn and generalize a treated sound to other word positions. According to Forrest, Elbert, and Dinnsen (1999), consistent substitution (CS) involves the same sound substitution in all word positions, whereas variable substitution (VS) involves different sound substitutions for a target sound within and across word positions. Previous research has indicated that variable substitution patterns predict that treatment targets will not generalize. In this study, it was, therefore, hypothesized that children with a consistent substitution would generalize treatment targets and children with variable substitutes would not generalize treatment targets. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the consistency or variability of a child’s substitution patterns was a reliable predictor of treatment outcomes.
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