Assistants: It Takes a Nation: Part II: Training and Supervising Speech-Language Pathology Assistants: The Arizona Territory, The Michigan Position and New Horizons Licensure laws for speech-language pathologists were enacted and passed by the Arizona legislature in 1995. These laws were implemented in January of 2000. However, the regulations did not contain language specific to speech-language assistants. Since the implementation of the licensure for speech-language pathologists, the Department of Health Services licensing ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2002
Assistants: It Takes a Nation: Part II: Training and Supervising Speech-Language Pathology Assistants: The Arizona Territory, The Michigan Position and New Horizons
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeanne M. Mullins
    Cape Fear Community College, Wilmington, NC
  • Kathleen Moore
    Scottsdale Community College, Scottsdale, AZ
  • Rhonda Kraai
    Baker College, Muskegon, MI
  • Linda Wortman-Lowe
    Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute, Caldwell, NC
  • Jeanne MullinsColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Assistants
Article   |   March 01, 2002
Assistants: It Takes a Nation: Part II: Training and Supervising Speech-Language Pathology Assistants: The Arizona Territory, The Michigan Position and New Horizons
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2002, Vol. 12, 15-16. doi:10.1044/aas12.1.15
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2002, Vol. 12, 15-16. doi:10.1044/aas12.1.15
Licensure laws for speech-language pathologists were enacted and passed by the Arizona legislature in 1995. These laws were implemented in January of 2000. However, the regulations did not contain language specific to speech-language assistants. Since the implementation of the licensure for speech-language pathologists, the Department of Health Services licensing office has received a number of inquires regarding the use of paraprofessionals. This has brought the issue of regulation of speech-language assistants to the forefront of the licensure debate.
Presently, the debate has focused on the interpretation of the “practice of speech-language pathology” as it is defined in the regulations. Does this definition describe the activities of the speech-language pathology assistant who is following a set of instructions, as opposed to “practicing speech-language pathology”? The law allows only a licensed speech-language pathologist to engage in the “practice” of speech-language pathology.
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