Assistants: Portrait of a Speech-Language Pathology Assistant As a director of a speech-language pathology assistant program at a community college that offers an associate degree in applied science, I have often been asked by speech-language pathology colleagues and other health care professionals to describe for them a typical speech-language pathology assistant. I have tried to do ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2002
Assistants: Portrait of a Speech-Language Pathology Assistant
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  • Jeanne MullinsColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Assistants
Article   |   March 01, 2002
Assistants: Portrait of a Speech-Language Pathology Assistant
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2002, Vol. 12, 16. doi:10.1044/aas12.1.16
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2002, Vol. 12, 16. doi:10.1044/aas12.1.16
As a director of a speech-language pathology assistant program at a community college that offers an associate degree in applied science, I have often been asked by speech-language pathology colleagues and other health care professionals to describe for them a typical speech-language pathology assistant. I have tried to do this on numerous occasions with minimal success. Therefore, instead of a statistical compilation, I periodically offer a profile of an individual assistant.
D.W., age 33, has been married for 7 years and currently has no children (but at the time of this writing, she was expecting triplets). She graduated from a 4-year university in 1989 with a BA on Oral Communications. D.W. spent the majority of her career working in advertising and soon became dissatisfied with the “cold, impersonal business world” and opted for a “warmer job with more personal satisfaction.” After weighing career opportunities, she decided on speech-language pathology. However, due to geographic constraints and marital ties, she chose to remain close to home and pursue speech-language pathology assisting. D.W. became an exemplary student and set standards of excellence “bar none.” She continued to excel despite monumental assignments bestowed upon her by her instructor and clinical supervisors. D.W. describes herself as a “hopeless romantic.” Hopeless? Never. Romantic? Absolutely! She has this romantic notion that she will one day make a difference. Well, she already has. Shortly after graduation, she landed a job working with the assistive technology director in a local school district. Staff and children adore her kindness and sense of humor. The children that she works with are busy using their augmentative communication devices to help her pick out baby names (three is a lot of names, they keep reminding her).
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