Outcomes Measurement and Management: Collection of Data in University Clinics: A National Survey The collection of outcomes data in a university speech-language clinic presents a unique challenge, given the variety of stakeholders represented in such settings. University clinics provide graduate (and sometimes undergraduate) students with clinical experience with a variety of communication disorders. The clinics are also part of academic programs that ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2003
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Collection of Data in University Clinics: A National Survey
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Bailey-Jones
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, State University of New York-College at Buffalo
  • Rosemary B. Lubinski
    Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, State University of New York-University at Buffalo
  • D. Jeffery Higginbotham
    Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, State University of New York-University at Buffalo
  • Carmen Vega-BarachowitzColumn Editor
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   October 01, 2003
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Collection of Data in University Clinics: A National Survey
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2003, Vol. 13, 13-15. doi:10.1044/aas13.3.13
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2003, Vol. 13, 13-15. doi:10.1044/aas13.3.13
The collection of outcomes data in a university speech-language clinic presents a unique challenge, given the variety of stakeholders represented in such settings. University clinics provide graduate (and sometimes undergraduate) students with clinical experience with a variety of communication disorders. The clinics are also part of academic programs that follow accreditation guidelines set forth by the Council of Academic Accreditation (CAA) of ASHA. Clinic supervisors, as members of university communities, must meet requirements for continuing appointment or tenure. In addition, many clinics serve as community clinics providing high quality services, charging fees, and collecting third-party payments. They are accountable to clients and, in these instances, are also required to follow payer guidelines. Services obtained at university clinics are deemed to be cutting edge, given the availability of research and teaching faculty. University clinic directors overseeing these programs must balance the need to provide high quality services to clients with meeting the needs of students, payers, and supervisors. Today, they face an additional demand as outcomes data are being requested from all stakeholders.
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