Ethics: Ethical Motivation Given the shortage of qualified clinical staff members, it is important that we maximize the labor force we have to ensure minimum staff turnover and reduce recruitment costs at the same time that we help employees realize their maximum potential. In order to do this, clinical managers need to ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2003
Ethics: Ethical Motivation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph B. Lejeune
    Genesis Rehabilitation Services, Kennett Square, PA
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Ethics
Article   |   October 01, 2003
Ethics: Ethical Motivation
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2003, Vol. 13, 7-9. doi:10.1044/aas13.3.7
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2003, Vol. 13, 7-9. doi:10.1044/aas13.3.7
Given the shortage of qualified clinical staff members, it is important that we maximize the labor force we have to ensure minimum staff turnover and reduce recruitment costs at the same time that we help employees realize their maximum potential. In order to do this, clinical managers need to have an understanding of the process of motivation, as well as strategies that have the ultimate impact: employees maintain their highest levels of efficiency.
The ASHA Code of Ethics contains provisions that mandate that we, as speech-language pathologists and audiologists, maintain harmonious relationships—both interdisciplinary and intradisciplinary. As clinical managers, we can fulfill this mandate, in part, in how we interact with our staff members on a day-to-day basis.
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