Outcomes Measurement and Management: Coaching Parents to Facilitate Language Development in At-Risk Toddlers The Speech-Language Clinic at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) serves a variety of clients from across the age span and presenting with a wide variety of disorders. Typically, however, the birth-to-three clinical population has not been a primary focus of service, leaving a void in terms of student training. ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2004
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Coaching Parents to Facilitate Language Development in At-Risk Toddlers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Toni B. Morehouse
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, The University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
Article Information
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   March 01, 2004
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Coaching Parents to Facilitate Language Development in At-Risk Toddlers
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2004, Vol. 14, 10-13. doi:10.1044/aas14.1.10
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2004, Vol. 14, 10-13. doi:10.1044/aas14.1.10
The Speech-Language Clinic at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) serves a variety of clients from across the age span and presenting with a wide variety of disorders. Typically, however, the birth-to-three clinical population has not been a primary focus of service, leaving a void in terms of student training. Recently, the public schools in the area redefined their services for toddlers, eliminating center-based programs and using only a home-based service delivery model. The UNL Clinic, then, piloted a center-based Parent-Toddler Program for the following reasons: (a) the clinic was receiving increasing numbers of toddler referrals, (b) students in training needed experience with the toddler population, (c) there is a dearth of similar programs in the community, (d) early intervention is known to make a difference (Bernheimer & Keogh, 1995; Guralnick, 2000; Shonkoff & Hauser-Cram, 1987), (e) a coaching model of intervention is ecologically sound for toddlers (Dunst, 2002; McCollum & Yates, 1994; Woods Cripe & Venn, 1997), and (f) children may benefit from observing and interacting with peers (Bruder & Staff, 1998; Hwang & Hughes, 2000).
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