Supervision: Clinic Directors of the Northeast Council of Educational Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders: The Power of the Collective Voice Clinical educators in communication sciences and disorders are charged with guiding the development of the next generation of audiologists and speech-language pathologists, ensuring that they ultimately demonstrate the competencies needed to enter the professional community. Those of us who serve as university clinic directors and coordinators in communication disorders ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2004
Supervision: Clinic Directors of the Northeast Council of Educational Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders: The Power of the Collective Voice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kevin M. McNamara
    Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT
  • Susan E. M. Bartlett
    The University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
  • Nancy LefkowitzColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Supervision
Article   |   March 01, 2004
Supervision: Clinic Directors of the Northeast Council of Educational Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders: The Power of the Collective Voice
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2004, Vol. 14, 14-17. doi:10.1044/aas14.1.14
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2004, Vol. 14, 14-17. doi:10.1044/aas14.1.14
Clinical educators in communication sciences and disorders are charged with guiding the development of the next generation of audiologists and speech-language pathologists, ensuring that they ultimately demonstrate the competencies needed to enter the professional community. Those of us who serve as university clinic directors and coordinators in communication disorders programs are in a unique position of overseeing a vital portion of this education process. Our roles are multifaceted, requiring us to wear many hats simultaneously. As administrators, we manage large clinical caseloads of people with diverse communication needs, and we assume responsibility for program finances, staffing, resource development, and scheduling, to name just a few administrative functions. As supervisors, we mentor both professional staff and student clinicians, ensuring that they not only comply with the responsibilities of their respective roles, but also feel supported and motivated to develop as professionals. In our role as clinical educators, we are responsible for employing best learning practices to bridge academic knowledge and applied clinical skills, while meeting the ever-evolving accreditation requirements of ASHA, State Departments of Education, and other credentialing bodies. We serve a vital function in our respective programs, collaborating with our other academic colleagues to develop and refine both program design and philosophy. We are an elite club of less than 300 people nationwide who share a similar mission. While the honor of this role is great, the responsibilities are immense, and the challenge of meeting these responsibilities can be overwhelming.
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