Audiology: State of the States: What Do They Regulate? The audiology submission for this issue is a compilation of information from the ASHA Website on the licensure requirements of each state for the practice of speech-language pathology and audiology, the dispensing of hearing aids, and the use of assistants. As much of the information as possible was verified ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
Audiology: State of the States: What Do They Regulate?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren R. Smith
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Rose L. Allen
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Rose AllenColumn Editor
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Audiology
Article   |   June 01, 2004
Audiology: State of the States: What Do They Regulate?
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2004, Vol. 14, 3-4. doi:10.1044/aas14.2.3
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2004, Vol. 14, 3-4. doi:10.1044/aas14.2.3
The audiology submission for this issue is a compilation of information from the ASHA Website on the licensure requirements of each state for the practice of speech-language pathology and audiology, the dispensing of hearing aids, and the use of assistants. As much of the information as possible was verified between January 1 and April 1, 2004, through verbal or written communication with each state licensing board or the president of the state speech, language, and hearing association. This information may be used by administrators, clinical directors, supervisors, and state association representatives to compare the practices of each state.
According to Battle (2001), two of the major reasons for regulating the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology are to “protect the consumer from unscrupulous or incompetent practice…” and “… assure(s) that services are being provided in a manner that meets professional standards for ethical practice” (p. 49). Licensure laws define the minimal standards necessary to practice the professions within the state. Many states have adopted the standards for the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) of ASHA as the standards for the state license. These standards include satisfactory completion of academic coursework, clinical practice hours, the PRAXIS examination, and the clinical fellowship year (CFY). Therefore, many states offer a form of “reciprocity.” Upon moving to another state to practice, the application form, proof of the ASHA CCC, and payment of fees may be all that is needed to obtain a new state license.
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