Supervision: Independent Contracting for the Pediatric Speech-Language Pathologist: Another Viable Career Option According to the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, in May 2003 there were 86,640 employed speech-language pathologists. Elementary and secondary schools were listed as having the highest levels of employment of this occupation, with 46,950 clinicians (U. S. Department of Labor, 2003). “Independent Contractors” make ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
Supervision: Independent Contracting for the Pediatric Speech-Language Pathologist: Another Viable Career Option
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michele Carr
    Pediatric Therapeutic Services (PTS), Inc., Yardley, PA
  • Elizabeth Zylla-JonesColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Supervision
Article   |   October 01, 2004
Supervision: Independent Contracting for the Pediatric Speech-Language Pathologist: Another Viable Career Option
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2004, Vol. 14, 15-19. doi:10.1044/aas14.3.15
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2004, Vol. 14, 15-19. doi:10.1044/aas14.3.15
According to the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, in May 2003 there were 86,640 employed speech-language pathologists. Elementary and secondary schools were listed as having the highest levels of employment of this occupation, with 46,950 clinicians (U. S. Department of Labor, 2003).
“Independent Contractors” make up approximately 6.7% of this total employment number for speech-language pathologists (Employment Policy Foundation, 1998). This percentage is continuing to grow year after year. According to the Employment Policy Foundation (1998), “approximately 90 percent of independent contractors choose such employment for personal reasons—they value the flexibility, enjoy being their own boss, or have family obligations or other personal reasons for not wanting a traditional job” (p. 4). Also, due to the shortage of speech-language pathologists, along with the demand for highly qualified personnel, in states such as California, Alabama, Indiana, and Pennsylvania (to name a few; ASHA, 2003), highly qualified, fully credentialed speech-language pathologists working as independent contractors have filled a desperate need for several school district in these states. There are some excellent job opportunities available for knowledgeable, fully credentialed independent contractor speech-language pathologists.
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