Student Prerequisites for Placement in Medical Settings Medical facilities spend manpower and money meeting the accreditation standards set forth by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), the accrediting body over healthcare organizations. New employees of JCAHO accredited facilities participate in lengthy orientations covering topics such as hospital policies, compliance issues, health risks, and ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2005
Student Prerequisites for Placement in Medical Settings
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurel H. Hays
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2005
Student Prerequisites for Placement in Medical Settings
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2005, Vol. 15, 11-14. doi:10.1044/aas15.1.11
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2005, Vol. 15, 11-14. doi:10.1044/aas15.1.11
Medical facilities spend manpower and money meeting the accreditation standards set forth by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), the accrediting body over healthcare organizations. New employees of JCAHO accredited facilities participate in lengthy orientations covering topics such as hospital policies, compliance issues, health risks, and safeguards. Students choosing to gain clinical experience in medical facilities must adhere to the same guidelines as health-care employees, and, therefore, students must receive similar training, certifications, and health screenings. Although requirements vary among facilities, graduate training programs can provide much of the required documentation for their students to assist with the administrative burdens associated with student orientation and to maintain the host facilities’ compliance. The more common requirements are outlined in this article and serve as a guide for graduate training programs in preparing their students for clinical practice in medical settings. Students will be able to spend increased time in direct patient care and to accrue clinical clock hours when graduate training programs meet the common requirements prior to students’ arrival at the medical facilities.
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