Assistants: The Regulation of SLP Assistants Remains a State-by-State Issue I last provided an update on issues involving “Assistants” in the March 2004 issue of Perspectives. In that issue the importance of maintaining a national credential when using speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs) in service delivery was discussed. I also discussed a resolution that had been considered by the Legislative ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2005
Assistants: The Regulation of SLP Assistants Remains a State-by-State Issue
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  • Lisa O’ConnorColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Assistants
Article   |   March 01, 2005
Assistants: The Regulation of SLP Assistants Remains a State-by-State Issue
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2005, Vol. 15, 2-3. doi:10.1044/aas15.1.2
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2005, Vol. 15, 2-3. doi:10.1044/aas15.1.2
I last provided an update on issues involving “Assistants” in the March 2004 issue of Perspectives. In that issue the importance of maintaining a national credential when using speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs) in service delivery was discussed. I also discussed a resolution that had been considered by the Legislative Council (LC) in November 2003. That resolution asked the Executive Board (EB) of ASHA to explore options for outsourcing the expensive accreditation process, which had been a primary reason the LC voted to discontinue ASHA approval of SLPA training programs (LC meeting March 2003). That resolution also requested that EB report back to LC in March 2004 with its findings. A report from EB was presented to LC at their March 2004 meeting, and it primarily discussed the pros and cons of using the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) for accrediting training programs. Because the information was so new, there was not time to develop new resolutions for presentation at that March 2004 LC meeting. Instead, a group of individuals from several states, primarily Alaska, California, Washington, Wisconsin, and North Carolina talked over the summer and into the fall by telephone and email about how it might be best to proceed. The primary objective was to find a way for ASHA to be involved in some way that would facilitate the establishment of a national credential for assistants and approval of SLPA training programs.
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