Remediating Poorly Performing Students in Clinical Programs A major factor that influences how remediation of students is approached is the philosophy of the individual program. It is essential that you examine your program’s mission and goals. Subsequently, it is critical to examine your program’s philosophy regarding its commitment to the marginal student. Dowling (2001) defined the ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2005
Remediating Poorly Performing Students in Clinical Programs
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith Brasseur
    California State University Chico, Chico, CA
  • Elizabeth McCrea
    Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
  • Lisa Lucks Mendel
    University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2005
Remediating Poorly Performing Students in Clinical Programs
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2005, Vol. 15, 20-26. doi:10.1044/aas15.3.20
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2005, Vol. 15, 20-26. doi:10.1044/aas15.3.20
A major factor that influences how remediation of students is approached is the philosophy of the individual program. It is essential that you examine your program’s mission and goals. Subsequently, it is critical to examine your program’s philosophy regarding its commitment to the marginal student.
Dowling (2001) defined the marginal clinician as one who cannot work independently, is not able to formulate appropriate clinical goals and procedures, has basic gaps in conceptual understanding, and cannot follow through with suggestions (p. 162). She also pointed out that supervisees who are marginal clinicians are typically identified relatively soon after they begin practicum, because they have problems during initial testing or early in the process of planning and implementing treatment. Further, they lack the ability to accurately evaluate their own performance and have inflated perceptions of their competence. In contrast, some students may be performing poorly because of language issues, or because of gender, cultural, or generational differences.
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