Audiology: Professional Behaviors in Audiology In educating future audiologists, we aim toward developing their knowledge and use of theory and research, clinical procedures and protocols, and professional behaviors. Ideally, all classroom and clinical experiences might include some mix of all three areas. For example, during a physiology course, a discussion of the acoustic reflex ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2006
Audiology: Professional Behaviors in Audiology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah Culbertson
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Jane Painter
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Laura Carr
    Eastern North Carolina School for the Deaf, Wilson, NC
  • Deborah CulbertsonColumn Editor
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Audiology
Article   |   March 01, 2006
Audiology: Professional Behaviors in Audiology
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2006, Vol. 16, 12-13. doi:10.1044/aas16.1.12
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2006, Vol. 16, 12-13. doi:10.1044/aas16.1.12
In educating future audiologists, we aim toward developing their knowledge and use of theory and research, clinical procedures and protocols, and professional behaviors. Ideally, all classroom and clinical experiences might include some mix of all three areas. For example, during a physiology course, a discussion of the acoustic reflex arc could extend to clinical measurement of reflexes, and then students could be directed to a related independent, but not required, reading. While many students dutifully study the reflex arc (that will be covered on an exam) and excitedly consider the clinical measures, the independent reading is often left unread. We may learn that one of our students at an off-campus clinical site has announced to her preceptor that she must leave the site 2 hours early to complete a term paper. Another student clinician may enthusiastically describe a client’s “huge perforation” in front of the client. In all three circumstances, students are often surprised to learn that their actions are viewed as “not professional.” What do we mean when we use the term “professional behaviors” and when do we expect students to learn and use these behaviors?
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