Technology: Distance Supervision: An Update Distance supervision, or e-supervision, refers to the use of two-way interactive videoconferencing technology for live supervision of graduate students. This model was described in a Division 11 Perspectives article (Dudding, 2002). In that article, I described the rationale and technical requirements for utilizing videoconferencing to supervise graduate students in ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2006
Technology: Distance Supervision: An Update
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol C Dudding
    Longwood University, Longwood, VA
  • Juliann WoodsColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Technology
Article   |   March 01, 2006
Technology: Distance Supervision: An Update
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2006, Vol. 16, 16-18. doi:10.1044/aas16.1.16
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2006, Vol. 16, 16-18. doi:10.1044/aas16.1.16
Distance supervision, or e-supervision, refers to the use of two-way interactive videoconferencing technology for live supervision of graduate students. This model was described in a Division 11 Perspectives article (Dudding, 2002). In that article, I described the rationale and technical requirements for utilizing videoconferencing to supervise graduate students in public school practica. Since that time, I have supervised additional students, conducted research, and further investigated this model of supervision. This current article provides an update of my experiences and the findings with graduate students involved in distance or e-supervision.
The Communication Disorders Program at the University of Virginia began employing videoconferencing for supervision of graduate students enrolled in the distance education component of the program. Courses were delivered to a central off-campus location via videoconferencing, but the challenges came in providing the necessary clinical supervision of these students. These challenges were twofold: the program needed to assure an appropriate amount of supervision and that the supervision was being provided by a qualified professional in public schools across the Commonwealth. Furthermore, the University of Virginia program, at that time, required the initial 25 hours of clinical experiences to be supervised by an employee of the university. The program looked towards technology in meeting these challenges.
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