Assistants: Assistants in Service Delivery: The Perspective of an SLPA When I was a school “lunch lady” in 2001, I never even imagined myself working for a school district in a different capacity, but now I do. After going through the Speech, Language Pathology Assistant program at Pasadena City College in California, I entered the work force. I am ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2006
Assistants: Assistants in Service Delivery: The Perspective of an SLPA
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca Pope
    Baldwin Park Unified School District, Baldwin, CA
  • Lisa O’ConnorColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Assistants
Article   |   March 01, 2006
Assistants: Assistants in Service Delivery: The Perspective of an SLPA
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2006, Vol. 16, 2-3. doi:10.1044/aas16.1.2
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2006, Vol. 16, 2-3. doi:10.1044/aas16.1.2
When I was a school “lunch lady” in 2001, I never even imagined myself working for a school district in a different capacity, but now I do. After going through the Speech, Language Pathology Assistant program at Pasadena City College in California, I entered the work force. I am currently working for Baldwin Park Unified School District here in California, and I serve elementary age students in regular education and in special day classes.
Before gaining employment with this school district, I worked for 6 months with a private practice and the clientele, of course, was much different. My current supervising speech-language pathologist (SLP) was instrumental in my successful transition. Although I came in with some of my own ideas, I was very motivated to learn more and found I needed her guidance to adapt to the classroom and small-group setting. After she modeled therapy in the classroom environment, she observed my doing the same. She offered invaluable suggestions and tips but, in all honesty, on some occasions, I found myself leaving the special day classes looking like a deer caught in the headlights! It’s a funny thing how children, especially children with special needs, just don’t always follow my script.
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