Financial and Business Issues: Discharge Planning—Return on Investment for the Patient, SLP and Medical Setting Since speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practice under the chronic threat of budget cuts and increased regulatory scrutiny, a proactive action that can benefit patient care, reimbursement/ funding and our own job satisfaction is discharge planning. In the Disease Specific Care Certification Manual, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2006
Financial and Business Issues: Discharge Planning—Return on Investment for the Patient, SLP and Medical Setting
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna Fitzgerald-DeJean
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA
  • Peter JohnsonColumn Editor
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Healthcare Settings / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Financial and Business Issues
Article   |   March 01, 2006
Financial and Business Issues: Discharge Planning—Return on Investment for the Patient, SLP and Medical Setting
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2006, Vol. 16, 3-6. doi:10.1044/aas16.1.3
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2006, Vol. 16, 3-6. doi:10.1044/aas16.1.3
Since speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practice under the chronic threat of budget cuts and increased regulatory scrutiny, a proactive action that can benefit patient care, reimbursement/ funding and our own job satisfaction is discharge planning. In the Disease Specific Care Certification Manual, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO, 2004) defines discharge planning as:

A formalized process in a health care organization through which a program of continuing and follow-up care is planned and carried out for each patient. Discharge planning encompasses a documented sequence of tasks and activities designed to achieve, within projected time frames, stated goals that lead to the timely release of patients to either their homes or facilities or programs with a lower level of care. Discharge planning is undertaken to ensure that patients remain in a health care organization only for as long as medically needed (Glossary 4).

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