Technology: Technological Supplements to the Clinical Dysphagia Examination Instrumentation and advancements in technology are no strangers to the speech-language pathologist (SLP). Many professionals working within our scope of practice utilize instrumentation on a daily basis. From the early days of our discipline, research scientists have added to our understanding of communication through careful measurement/monitoring of the speech ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2006
Technology: Technological Supplements to the Clinical Dysphagia Examination
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie A.G. Stierwalt
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Juliann WoodsColumn Editor
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Technology
Article   |   June 01, 2006
Technology: Technological Supplements to the Clinical Dysphagia Examination
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2006, Vol. 16, 18-22. doi:10.1044/aas16.2.18
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2006, Vol. 16, 18-22. doi:10.1044/aas16.2.18
Instrumentation and advancements in technology are no strangers to the speech-language pathologist (SLP). Many professionals working within our scope of practice utilize instrumentation on a daily basis. From the early days of our discipline, research scientists have added to our understanding of communication through careful measurement/monitoring of the speech execution mechanism as well as components of language (Kent, 1997).
To add to the study of communication for SLPs, the assimilation of swallowing and swallowing impairment into our scope of practice has garnered new avenues of instrumentation and measurement. Perhaps the most familiar tools in the examination of dysphagia are videofluoroscopy and fiber endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, or FEES (Logemann, 1998). Each of these technologies incorporate some form of imaging technique that provide clinicians with a window into an individuals anatomy, allowing for inspection of structures as well as systematic analysis of their physiology during the act of swallowing. The advent of these techniques have brought a wealth of knowledge with regard to our understanding of normal and impaired swallowing function. While videofluoroscopy has been considered by some as the “gold standard” for assessment of dysphagia, the use of FEES or the newer version which includes sensory (Aviv & Murry, 2005) testing (FEEST) is gaining in popularity. The value of these techniques have led to widespread use, thus, incorporating this technology is often an every-day occurrence for the SLP who practices in a medical facility.
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