Technology: The A-AAC-A: An Observational Tool for Clinical Supervisors The process of observation is but one, yet vital, component of supervising students in the clinical arena. Historically, the literature on the supervisory process has emphasized that observation should be planned, active, and systematic, as well as empirical, allowing for the collection of data that subsequently will be placed ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2006
Technology: The A-AAC-A: An Observational Tool for Clinical Supervisors
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anthony B. DeFeo
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Cass Faux
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Juliann WoodsColumn Editor
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Professional Issues & Training / Technology
Article   |   June 01, 2006
Technology: The A-AAC-A: An Observational Tool for Clinical Supervisors
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2006, Vol. 16, 22-24. doi:10.1044/aas16.2.22
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2006, Vol. 16, 22-24. doi:10.1044/aas16.2.22
The process of observation is but one, yet vital, component of supervising students in the clinical arena. Historically, the literature on the supervisory process has emphasized that observation should be planned, active, and systematic, as well as empirical, allowing for the collection of data that subsequently will be placed into a broader context for analysis and interpretation (McCrea & Brasseur, 2003). Additional insight from the literature can be gained by considering various modes of observation (Farmer & Farmer, 1989) and selecting from categories of data collection procedures (Casey, Smith, & Ulrich, 1988).
Furthermore, in our work at the University of Arizona, we have increasingly felt the need to develop tools of observation that are disorder-specific. As the knowledge base in speech-language pathology increases, almost exponentially, a generic tool may obscure the detail of what needs to be observed during a treatment interaction, affecting the reliability and validity of that observation. Nowhere is this more important than when supervising in the area of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention. Few systems of AAC supervisory observation are available to clinical instructors; hence, the development of the A-AAC-A: Arizona Augmentative and Alternative Communication Analysis (Faux & DeFeo, 2006 ). This proposed observational tool examines the “stuff” of AAC treatment interaction through a system of “Checks and Valences.” The parameters for the A-AAC-A were drawn from a literature review in AAC, language science, clinical training, supervision, and evidence-based practice (e.g., Beukelman & Mirenda, 1998; Boone & Prescott, 1972; Dore, 1974; Light & Binger, 1989; McCrea & Brasseur, 2003; Olswang, 1990; Schlosser, 2003; Yorkston, 1992).
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