Supervision: Using Mid-Semester Student Self-Evaluations To Improve Clinical Performance Improving clinical performance of student clinicians is a significant challenge for clinical instructors. Involving students in evaluating their own clinical performance is one method for improving clinical skills. One of the supervisory tasks and competencies identified by ASHA in its 1985 position statement on Clinical Supervision in Speech-Language Pathology ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2006
Supervision: Using Mid-Semester Student Self-Evaluations To Improve Clinical Performance
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Zylla-Jones
    Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Elizabeth Zylla-JonesColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Supervision
Article   |   June 01, 2006
Supervision: Using Mid-Semester Student Self-Evaluations To Improve Clinical Performance
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2006, Vol. 16, 8-12. doi:10.1044/aas16.2.8
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2006, Vol. 16, 8-12. doi:10.1044/aas16.2.8
Improving clinical performance of student clinicians is a significant challenge for clinical instructors. Involving students in evaluating their own clinical performance is one method for improving clinical skills. One of the supervisory tasks and competencies identified by ASHA in its 1985 position statement on Clinical Supervision in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology focused on assisting students in evaluating their own clinical performance. Anderson (1988), in her discussion of supervision styles, identified three stages in the continuum of supervision:
Students’ placement on the supervisory continuum may vary depending on their comfort level with any given case. Students may feel comfortable receiving minimal allowable supervisory input for cases in which they have had previous experience (i.e., articulation and language), thus placing them in the later stages of the continuum. When assigned unfamiliar or more challenging cases (i.e., aphasia and dysphagia), students may benefit from a more directive approach, such as that in the Evaluation-Feedback Stage. Unfortunately, many supervisors habitually use a more directive style of supervision with all students. Overuse of this type of supervision may prevent students from developing their own treatment style and restricts independence. Students should take a more active role in the supervisory process (such as that used in the Transitional Stage of Supervision) and aim for clinical independence.
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