Outcomes Measurement and Management: Effectiveness of Mediated Analysis in Improving Student Clinical Competency In clinical settings, most feedback to students is presented verbally and/or in written form. There are occasions when the clinical instructor models clinical behaviors during the session that the students often imitate (Crowe, 1995; Gillam & Pena, 1995). This method of supervision is termed conventional or traditional supervision (Anderson, ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2006
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Effectiveness of Mediated Analysis in Improving Student Clinical Competency
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara R. Weltsch
    Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
  • Linda K. Crowe
    Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
  • Melanie HudsonColumn Editor
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   October 01, 2006
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Effectiveness of Mediated Analysis in Improving Student Clinical Competency
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2006, Vol. 16, 21-22. doi:10.1044/aas16.3.21
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2006, Vol. 16, 21-22. doi:10.1044/aas16.3.21
In clinical settings, most feedback to students is presented verbally and/or in written form. There are occasions when the clinical instructor models clinical behaviors during the session that the students often imitate (Crowe, 1995; Gillam & Pena, 1995). This method of supervision is termed conventional or traditional supervision (Anderson, 1988). Disadvantages to this form of conventional supervision, for both the supervisor and student, include time demands, repetitive feedback, and student dependency (Williams, 1995).
Generally, when a supervisor uses the conventional approach the students are passively involved and expected to learn incidentally. While the strategies of the conventional approach work for many students, certain students or clinical situations require learning on a more active level. One way of engaging students in active learning is through written self-analysis of their discrete verbal and nonverbal clinical behaviors (Gillam, Roussos, & Anderson, 1990). The purpose of our study was to determine if students could improve their clinical interactions and behaviors through a mediated self-analysis approach.
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