Assistants: Support Personnel in Speech-Language Pathology: Review of Available Research Speech-language pathology services that follow principles of evidence-based practice base clinical decisions on the highest quality of scientific evidence available, on professional judgment, and on client preferences and values (ASHA, 2004a). One of the first steps in evidence-based practice is to determine the range and quality of the research ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2006
Assistants: Support Personnel in Speech-Language Pathology: Review of Available Research
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane R. Paul
    American Speech-Language Hearing Association, Rockville, MD
  • Susan Sparks
    Shoreline Community College, Shoreline, WA
  • Lisa O’ConnorColumn Editor
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Assistants
Article   |   October 01, 2006
Assistants: Support Personnel in Speech-Language Pathology: Review of Available Research
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2006, Vol. 16, 3-6. doi:10.1044/aas16.3.3
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2006, Vol. 16, 3-6. doi:10.1044/aas16.3.3
Speech-language pathology services that follow principles of evidence-based practice base clinical decisions on the highest quality of scientific evidence available, on professional judgment, and on client preferences and values (ASHA, 2004a). One of the first steps in evidence-based practice is to determine the range and quality of the research that is available to support a particular practice. We wanted to examine the research related to the use of support personnel in speech-language pathology.
The use of support personnel has been a controversial aspect of practice in speech-language pathology. Under ideal circumstances, support personnel are used to extend the frequency and intensity of services to meet the individual needs of clients. However, support personnel are used in some settings for the purpose of managing personnel shortages rather than supplementing and enhancing services provided by speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Regardless of the reason that SLP support personnel are employed, we need to know the nature and extent of the research available regarding their use.
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