Supervision: Supervisory Feedback: A Review of the Literature Clinical supervision is an essential component of educational training programs. According to Bernard and Goodyear (2004), clinical supervision has two central purposes: (a) to foster supervisees’ professional development and (b) to ensure client welfare. Provision of feedback by the supervisor is vital to changes in student behavior and to ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2007
Supervision: Supervisory Feedback: A Review of the Literature
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura Brown Moss
    University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Elizabeth Zylla JonesColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Supervision
Article   |   March 01, 2007
Supervision: Supervisory Feedback: A Review of the Literature
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2007, Vol. 17, 10-12. doi:10.1044/aas17.1.10
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2007, Vol. 17, 10-12. doi:10.1044/aas17.1.10
Clinical supervision is an essential component of educational training programs. According to Bernard and Goodyear (2004), clinical supervision has two central purposes: (a) to foster supervisees’ professional development and (b) to ensure client welfare. Provision of feedback by the supervisor is vital to changes in student behavior and to the development of clinical knowledge and skills. Professional development among students has been suggested to be dependent upon the quality and quantity of feedback provided (Kadushin, 1985). In basic terms, supervisees learn through the use of effective feedback.
The supervision literature offers consistent recommendations regarding the components of effective feedback. For instance, findings from the literature suggest that feedback should be consistent and objective, based on behaviorally defined standards, free from bias, timely, clearly understood and specific, based on direct observations, balanced, and reciprocal in nature (Freeman, 1985; Lehrman-Water-man & Ladany, 2001). Various methods of providing feedback exist. These include written feedback, spontaneous verbal interactions, and live supervision (McCrea & Brasseur, 2003).
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