Outcomes Measurement and Management: Outcome-Based Performance Evaluation Evaluating employee performance, particularly documenting changes based on those evaluations, has always been a challenge. The emphasis on evidence-based practice has focused clinicians providing treatment to achieve outcomes based on clinical research. An outcome-based performance evaluation focuses supervisors on evaluating performance by providing employees with measurable goals that are ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2007
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Outcome-Based Performance Evaluation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia A. Ritter
    The Treatment and Learning Centers, Rockville, MD
  • Emily Kinsler
    The Treatment and Learning Centers, Rockville, MD
  • Melanie HudsonColumn Editor
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   June 01, 2007
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Outcome-Based Performance Evaluation
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2007, Vol. 17, 15-18. doi:10.1044/aas17.2.15
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2007, Vol. 17, 15-18. doi:10.1044/aas17.2.15
Evaluating employee performance, particularly documenting changes based on those evaluations, has always been a challenge. The emphasis on evidence-based practice has focused clinicians providing treatment to achieve outcomes based on clinical research. An outcome-based performance evaluation focuses supervisors on evaluating performance by providing employees with measurable goals that are tied to compensation.
The Board of Directors of The Treatment and Learning Centers (TLC), a private nonprofit agency, directed the management team to develop a merit pay system for all employees. This initiative came from board members in the for-profit business sector whose business practices included accountability in measurable terms. This was a challenge for the entire agency, given the diversity of programs, including outpatient services, school programs, child care program, and administrative support staff. This was a unique problem for clinical positions, including audiology and speech-language pathology, since the nature of the therapeutic process included many variables the clinicians felt were beyond their control. The performance system was established in 1998 and has evolved over time. It continues to be the method for employee compensation and yearly raises.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.