Supervision: Using a Junior Clinician Program to Optimize Clinical Observation Auburn University Speech and Hearing Clinic (AUSHC) has developed an innovative junior clinician program designed to actively involve students during the observation process. This junior clinician program encourages students to become active, rather than passive, participants while obtaining ASHA required observation hours. Beginning students (junior clinicians) are paired with ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2007
Supervision: Using a Junior Clinician Program to Optimize Clinical Observation
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  • Elizabeth Zylla-JonesColumn Editor
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Professional Issues & Training / Supervision
Article   |   June 01, 2007
Supervision: Using a Junior Clinician Program to Optimize Clinical Observation
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2007, Vol. 17, 8-11. doi:10.1044/aas17.2.8
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2007, Vol. 17, 8-11. doi:10.1044/aas17.2.8
Auburn University Speech and Hearing Clinic (AUSHC) has developed an innovative junior clinician program designed to actively involve students during the observation process. This junior clinician program encourages students to become active, rather than passive, participants while obtaining ASHA required observation hours. Beginning students (junior clinicians) are paired with senior clinicians who serve as mentors. Junior clinicians practice clinical techniques that they have recently observed under the guidance of their mentor. The experience should result in improved observation skills, and later, in better clinical performance. These students should be more active observers throughout their clinical careers.
ASHA mandates that students receive a minimum of 25 hours of clinical observation either prior to, or concurrent with, their clinical practicum experience (2000). Traditionally, these hours were completed prior to beginning clinical practicum. More recently, ASHA (2005)  has allowed the completion of the 25 observation hours to occur in conjunction with clinical practicum. In fact, many off-campus sites expect that students will complete some observation hours onsite prior to serving clients (McCrea & Brasseur, 2003). However, the majority of observation hours will continue to be completed in the university setting under the direction of a university clinical supervisor. It is our challenge as university clinical educators to ensure that students obtain the most benefit possible from their observation experience.
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