Supervision: Generational Differences: Do They Make A Difference in Supervisory and Administrative Relationships? Many of our professional relationships involve interactions between people from four different generations, described by Lancaster and Stillman (2002)  as Traditionalists (born 1900–1945), Baby Boomers (born 1946–1964), Generation Xers (born 1965–1980), and Millennials (born 1981–1999). For example, in a hypothetical department of communication sciences and disorders (CSD) chaired by ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Supervision: Generational Differences: Do They Make A Difference in Supervisory and Administrative Relationships?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vicki McCready
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC
  • Elizabeth Zylla-JonesColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Supervision
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Supervision: Generational Differences: Do They Make A Difference in Supervisory and Administrative Relationships?
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2007, Vol. 17, 6-9. doi:10.1044/aas17.3.6
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2007, Vol. 17, 6-9. doi:10.1044/aas17.3.6
Many of our professional relationships involve interactions between people from four different generations, described by Lancaster and Stillman (2002)  as Traditionalists (born 1900–1945), Baby Boomers (born 1946–1964), Generation Xers (born 1965–1980), and Millennials (born 1981–1999). For example, in a hypothetical department of communication sciences and disorders (CSD) chaired by a 42-year-old Generation Xer, a 60-year-old Baby Boomer clinical educator might supervise a 23-year-old Millennial graduate student treating a 70-year-old Traditionalist. The CSD administrative office staff who interact with the department head, the clinical educator, the student, and the client are: a 67-year-old Traditionalist, a 55-year-old Baby Boomer, and a 39-year-old Generation Xer who is the office manager. Misunderstandings, unspoken attitudes and assumptions, and conflict could easily arise from generation gap differences in all these overlapping relationships.
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