Training Graduate Student Clinicians to Use Preschool Peer Interaction Strategies Playing with peers is an important part of childhood—what children learn from interacting with one another has enormous impact on both their social and language development. Although many children naturally develop the ability to interact well with peers, some children have difficulty interacting with other children and may miss out ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2009
Training Graduate Student Clinicians to Use Preschool Peer Interaction Strategies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Corey L. Herd
    Radford University, Radford, VA
  • Melanie HudsonColumn Editor
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes
Article   |   March 01, 2009
Training Graduate Student Clinicians to Use Preschool Peer Interaction Strategies
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2009, Vol. 19, 13-18. doi:10.1044/aas19.1.13
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, March 2009, Vol. 19, 13-18. doi:10.1044/aas19.1.13
Abstract

Playing with peers is an important part of childhood—what children learn from interacting with one another has enormous impact on both their social and language development. Although many children naturally develop the ability to interact well with peers, some children have difficulty interacting with other children and may miss out on important learning opportunities as a result. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can target the peer interactions of young children on their caseload, assuming that they have the knowledge and skills with which to address them. SLP graduate programs have the opportunity to provide future SLPs with both knowledge and skills-based training. This study assessed a graduate program in which three graduate clinicians participated in a preschool program for children with communication disorders; peer interactions were targeted within the program. The students were observed and data was collected regarding their use of peer interaction facilitation strategies in the group sessions both prior to and after they participated in a direct training program regarding the use of such skills. Outcomes indicate that the direct training program resulted in a statistically significant increase in the students' use of different strategies to facilitate peer interactions among the children in the group.

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