Reflections on Reflections: Learning Processes in Speech and Language Pathology Students' Clinical Education The investigators' goal was to study the early clinical education processes of students enrolled in a speech-language pathology program by analyzing content of their written reflections. In this study, the authors propose and apply a method of analyzing written reflections of the students during the first stages of their clinical ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2009
Reflections on Reflections: Learning Processes in Speech and Language Pathology Students' Clinical Education
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sara Meilijson
    Hadassah Academic College JerusalemJerusalem, Israel
  • Irit Katzenberger
    Hadassah Academic College JerusalemJerusalem, Israel
  • Embry BurrusColumn Editor
Article Information
Development / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Supervision
Article   |   June 01, 2009
Reflections on Reflections: Learning Processes in Speech and Language Pathology Students' Clinical Education
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2009, Vol. 19, 62-71. doi:10.1044/aas19.2.62
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, June 2009, Vol. 19, 62-71. doi:10.1044/aas19.2.62
Abstract

The investigators' goal was to study the early clinical education processes of students enrolled in a speech-language pathology program by analyzing content of their written reflections. In this study, the authors propose and apply a method of analyzing written reflections of the students during the first stages of their clinical education. Forty written reflections taken from the observation reports submitted by the students were compiled from the first and second year students of the Communication Disorders Department. A quantitative (number of words and clauses of the entire report and its content categories) and a qualitative analysis (based upon the three qualitative levels of reflections suggested by Boud, Keogh, & Walker, 1985) were performed. Results show that text length of reflections increased with learning. Students use different content categories at different stages of the learning period. The level of reflection used most frequently by the students is “returning to experience.” The content categories raised by the students reflected complexity of the task, acquired knowledge of the students, and their ongoing experience. Written reflections may be used to evaluate the performance of students in the clinical education process.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Margaret Leahy from Trinity College Dublin for her advice and creative contributions to this paper.
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.