Quality Improvement—Give and Get How can clinicians be sure that the treatment orders, referrals, discharge summaries, and other recommendations they receive are authentic? Many times these requests are transmitted via verbal orders or technology, such as computers, e-mail, fax, voice mail, and other similar means. Before carrying out orders, it is important that ... QI Corner
QI Corner  |   May 01, 1997
Quality Improvement—Give and Get
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QI Corner
QI Corner   |   May 01, 1997
Quality Improvement—Give and Get
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, May 1997, Vol. 7, 3. doi:10.1044/aas7.2.3
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, May 1997, Vol. 7, 3. doi:10.1044/aas7.2.3
How can clinicians be sure that the treatment orders, referrals, discharge summaries, and other recommendations they receive are authentic? Many times these requests are transmitted via verbal orders or technology, such as computers, e-mail, fax, voice mail, and other similar means. Before carrying out orders, it is important that speech-language pathologists and other practitioners are sure the orders are authentic. Representatives at the ASHA office tell us that the number of questions received about this topic is increasing. Some practitioners are concerned with the time that lapses during the process of authentication. Others are seeking information about the impact of state and federal policies that influence authentication practices.
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