University Quality Improvement Example The quality improvement program within our university clinic is a joint effort. Quarterly indicators are decided upon by the supervisory staff during routine staff meetings. One difficulty we often have is narrowing our indicators to a reasonable number. Once indicators are selected, individual supervisors/students are assigned to collect the ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1997
University Quality Improvement Example
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah King
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   May 01, 1997
University Quality Improvement Example
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, May 1997, Vol. 7, 3-4. doi:10.1044/aas7.2.3-b
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, May 1997, Vol. 7, 3-4. doi:10.1044/aas7.2.3-b
The quality improvement program within our university clinic is a joint effort. Quarterly indicators are decided upon by the supervisory staff during routine staff meetings. One difficulty we often have is narrowing our indicators to a reasonable number. Once indicators are selected, individual supervisors/students are assigned to collect the data and analyze the outcomes. Reports of outcomes are submitted to the staff and a plan of action is developed based on the outcome.
Although a QI program can be a time-consuming venture, we have found that the improvements to our clinic operations and, therefore our client services, are well worth the time invested. We have used our QI program to market to managed care organizations and other third-party payers. Through our QI annual reports and quarterly indicators, we have marketed our commitment to providing the highest quality services in the most cost-effective manner. Our annual reports are used to alert our department head to our efforts as well as to provide information to higher administration regarding the clinic operations. Other benefits to our program are as follows: enhanced communication among staff; increased delegation of responsibilities; improvement in team work and productivity; elimination of unnecessary paperwork, tasks, etc.; improved work processes; and last but certainly not least, improved consumer care/satisfaction and improved client outcomes. With these outcomes, we are convinced that continuous quality improvement is a must for all programs.
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