Clinical Ethics: Patient Rights: Real or Imagined? As clinicians, we encounter daily situations in which we must stop to re-evaluate what we are doing to provide the best care for our patients. Many times situations arise in which clinicians need to discuss issues with their supervisors and administrators. Below are two situations in which discussions may ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1998
Clinical Ethics: Patient Rights: Real or Imagined?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Angela Ryker Mandas
    Long Beach Memorial Medical Center
  • Amy Baker
    Long Beach Memorial Medical Center
  • Editor: Angela Mandas
    Editor: Angela Mandas×
Article Information
Clinical Ethics
Article   |   October 01, 1998
Clinical Ethics: Patient Rights: Real or Imagined?
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1998, Vol. 8, 11-13. doi:10.1044/aas8.2.11
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1998, Vol. 8, 11-13. doi:10.1044/aas8.2.11
As clinicians, we encounter daily situations in which we must stop to re-evaluate what we are doing to provide the best care for our patients. Many times situations arise in which clinicians need to discuss issues with their supervisors and administrators. Below are two situations in which discussions may lead to a better understanding and ultimately a better outcome.
Jill, a speech language pathologist, is about to begin a dysphagia evaluation in radiology. She has informed the patient about the procedure, arranged for the different food and liquid consistencies, and donned the radiation jacket and skirt. The radiologist enters the room. Jill introduces the patient to the physician, reassures the patient and provides the background history as well as the key points that she wants to examine during the videofluoroscopy. The patient is nervous and begins to ask a lot of questions of the therapist. The radiologist becomes impatient and asks the patient to drink the barium first and ask questions later. Jill is thrown off by this comment and proceeds with the exam. The radiologist senses Jill’s uneasiness and decides to ask her to point out the anatomy during the evaluation. He then accuses her of not knowing the anatomy. Jill, flustered, ignores the comments from the physician and continues to ask the patient to swallow the next consistency. The radiologist stops the exam and asks Jill flat out, “What are you doing?” The patient is now upset with what is occurring and begins coughing.
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