Public School Talk: A Not So New Idea Since 1956, I have been directly involved either in matters of service delivery to children and youth with communication disabilities or in efforts to enhance such service delivery. Most of the time was as an administrator. Reflecting on the efforts of clinicians in the public schools, I am convinced ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1998
Public School Talk: A Not So New Idea
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas J. O’Toole
    JCT, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1998
Public School Talk: A Not So New Idea
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1998, Vol. 8, 14-16. doi:10.1044/aas8.2.14
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1998, Vol. 8, 14-16. doi:10.1044/aas8.2.14
Since 1956, I have been directly involved either in matters of service delivery to children and youth with communication disabilities or in efforts to enhance such service delivery. Most of the time was as an administrator. Reflecting on the efforts of clinicians in the public schools, I am convinced that they deal with some of the most challenging and rewarding service delivery issues in our professions. One of the major challenges is the continued need to demonstrate the effectiveness of the clinician’s efforts. This need is as real in the public schools as it is in the health services area. Administrators of speech-language and hearing services in the public schools need to be in the forefront of activities to meet this challenge.
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