Outcomes Measurement and Management: Measuring Functional Communication: Multicultural and International Applications ASHA recently received a 3-year grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), U.S. Department of Education, entitled “Measuring Functional Communication: Multicultural and International Applications.” The major goal of this project is to determine the multicultural and international applications of the ASHA Functional Assessment of Communication ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1998
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Measuring Functional Communication: Multicultural and International Applications
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane Paul-Brown
    ASHA
  • Carol J. Caperton
    ASHA
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   October 01, 1998
Outcomes Measurement and Management: Measuring Functional Communication: Multicultural and International Applications
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1998, Vol. 8, 9-10. doi:10.1044/aas8.2.9
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 1998, Vol. 8, 9-10. doi:10.1044/aas8.2.9
ASHA recently received a 3-year grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), U.S. Department of Education, entitled “Measuring Functional Communication: Multicultural and International Applications.” The major goal of this project is to determine the multicultural and international applications of the ASHA Functional Assessment of Communication Skills for Adults (ASHA FACS) Frattali, Thompson, Holland, Wohl, & Ferketic, 1995) and to develop a supplement to the measure that addresses quality of life.
The ASHA FACS is an observational tool of functional communication. The measure comprises four assessment domains (social communication; communication of basic needs; reading, writing, number concepts; and daily planning) which are rated on two scales: a seven-point scale of Communication Independence, and a five-point scale of Qualitative Dimensions of Communication. The ASHA FACS was previously validated with two client populations: adults with left-hemisphere stroke and adults with traumatic brain injury. It was found to be a reliable and valid measure of functional communication for these two client groups.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.