Medicare Corner: What Do We Say When Medicare Won’t Pay? Speech-language pathologists who have entered the sub-acute and extended care settings in the last 5 years have seen Medicare as a source of funding that allowed patients to receive a high level of care for an extended period. To them, the changes in methods of reimbursement brought about by ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 1999
Medicare Corner: What Do We Say When Medicare Won’t Pay?
Author Notes
  • Rehab Resource of Michigan 20019 Sibley Road Brownstown, MI 48192
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Medicare Corner
Article   |   April 01, 1999
Medicare Corner: What Do We Say When Medicare Won’t Pay?
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, April 1999, Vol. 9, 19-20. doi:10.1044/aas9.1.19
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, April 1999, Vol. 9, 19-20. doi:10.1044/aas9.1.19
Speech-language pathologists who have entered the sub-acute and extended care settings in the last 5 years have seen Medicare as a source of funding that allowed patients to receive a high level of care for an extended period. To them, the changes in methods of reimbursement brought about by the Prospective Payment System and the Part B Cap are dramatic and may seem like the beginning of the end of providing rehabilitation services in these settings. “But they need more treatment…I can’t discharge them yet!” and similar statements have been frequent since January 1, 1999.
As administrators and supervisors, many of us have been around long enough to remember when Medicare did not reimburse speech-language pathologists for swallowing intervention, followed by the days of being able to treat dysphagia only when there was a concomitant speech and/or language disorder. After years of advocacy, dysphagia treatment became a billable intervention, and our knowledge base and reimbursement for services showed steady growth. Recent changes do not represent an elimination of our ability to provide services, but rather a contraction from the pattern of intensive (and occasionally overutilized) services in the past few years. New restrictions may lessen what we can do for our patients; however, not all of the gains made in the past have been lost. Working within the new rules, we still can provide effective treatment for most of our patients.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.