Clinical Ethics: Ethical Management in a Challenging Health Care Setting Those of us in health care are faced daily with ethical decision making. Often, we may feel that a patient, family member, surrogate, or physician is making a decision about a patient’s medical care that may be in conflict with what we believe is the best. This case will ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 1999
Clinical Ethics: Ethical Management in a Challenging Health Care Setting
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Angela Ryker Mandas
    Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Long Beach, CA
  • Valerie Weber
    Medical Center at Princeton, Princeton, NJ
Article Information
Clinical Ethics
Article   |   April 01, 1999
Clinical Ethics: Ethical Management in a Challenging Health Care Setting
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, April 1999, Vol. 9, 6-8. doi:10.1044/aas9.1.6
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, April 1999, Vol. 9, 6-8. doi:10.1044/aas9.1.6
Those of us in health care are faced daily with ethical decision making. Often, we may feel that a patient, family member, surrogate, or physician is making a decision about a patient’s medical care that may be in conflict with what we believe is the best. This case will highlight an ethical dilemma that all professionals may encounter in their careers.
Mr. K. is a 54-year-old man who suffered a traumatic brain injury 6 weeks before his transfer to a rehabilitation hospital. Upon arrival, the rehabilitation team greets his wife. She expresses appreciation for accepting her husband into the program. The speech-language pathologist explains her role to the patient and wife and inquires about their concerns and their goals for speech, swallowing, and cognition. The patient has a tracheostomy tube and is unable to verbalize. The clinician and spouse discuss goals and plans for the patient’s rehabilitation process. Since the patient is notably fatigued from the long drive and the events of the day, the clinician informs them that evaluations will begin tomorrow. Upon leaving the room, the wife informs the clinician that she is pleased that her thoughts are being acknowledged, her goals will be addressed and that the team knows how to work with neurologically impaired adults.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.