Supervision: Supervisory Needs as Perceived by Licensed Speech-Language Pathology Assistants In this column, we will begin to examine issues related to speech-language pathology assistants and their perceived needs as to supervision by speech-language pathologists. As we are all aware, the supervision of assistants is new territory. This article addresses one practitioner’s view on the topic. The supervisory process ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 1999
Supervision: Supervisory Needs as Perceived by Licensed Speech-Language Pathology Assistants
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jean Suzanne Mead
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA
Article Information
Supervision
Article   |   July 01, 1999
Supervision: Supervisory Needs as Perceived by Licensed Speech-Language Pathology Assistants
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, July 1999, Vol. 9, 14-15. doi:10.1044/aas9.2.14
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, July 1999, Vol. 9, 14-15. doi:10.1044/aas9.2.14
In this column, we will begin to examine issues related to speech-language pathology assistants and their perceived needs as to supervision by speech-language pathologists. As we are all aware, the supervision of assistants is new territory. This article addresses one practitioner’s view on the topic.
The supervisory process as it occurs in the field of human communication disorders has been studied for several decades. The primary focus of those studies has been on student clinicians enrolled in clinical practica and on those individuals completing a clinical fellowship year. However, faced with the challenge of expanding the quality of speech-language pathology services, the ASHA’s Legislative Council recently sanctioned a strategic plan to implement guidelines for the training, credentialing, use, and supervision of speech-language pathology assistants (ASHA, 1996). With these guidelines in mind, the focus of supervision in the communication disorder’s profession will expand to include the relationship between speech-language pathology assistants and their supervising speech-language pathologists. In light of the necessary and appropriate supervision recommended for assistants, research was recently conducted to explore the supervisory process as it occurred between the assistants and their speech-language-pathology supervisors.
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