Audiology Issues: State-of -the-Art Care: At Least Know What’s Going On As health care professionals, we all strive to keep up with advances in our respective fields and provide state-of-the-art care for our patients. Frustrations arise when we find that other colleagues in our field are not abreast of current standard of care and provide patients and families with outdated ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 1999
Audiology Issues: State-of -the-Art Care: At Least Know What’s Going On
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lori Van Riper
    University Of Michigan, Health Systems, Ann Arbor, MI
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Audiology Issues
Article   |   July 01, 1999
Audiology Issues: State-of -the-Art Care: At Least Know What’s Going On
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, July 1999, Vol. 9, 15-16. doi:10.1044/aas9.2.15
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, July 1999, Vol. 9, 15-16. doi:10.1044/aas9.2.15
As health care professionals, we all strive to keep up with advances in our respective fields and provide state-of-the-art care for our patients. Frustrations arise when we find that other colleagues in our field are not abreast of current standard of care and provide patients and families with outdated information or incorrect information. The two following cases portray this ethical dilemma that many of us confront too frequently.
M. M. was a healthy 8-month-old boy until he suffered a severe case of bacterial meningitis. Three weeks into his recovery, an auditory brainstem response screening suggested significant hearing loss. A repeat screening 5 days later was unchanged. The infant did have some neurologic sequelae as a result of the illness. No behavioral testing, immittance testing or otoacoustic emissions were completed. The audiologist referred the infant to his pediatrician for follow-up. The pediatrician recommended the child have a repeat ABR in 6 months to see if anything had changed. The speech-language pathologist who was working with the child and his family in rehabilitation contacted an audiologist at another facility, questioning the plan for audiologic follow-up. The protocol at the second facility in cases of hearing loss associated with meningitis is to confirm the loss via a battery of tests. If the loss is severe to profound of sensorineural nature, an immediate referral is made for amplification, early intervention, and consult with the cochlear implant team. In cases of bacterial meningitis, the cochlea frequently begins to ossify within the first few months. Thus, being ready to pursue the cochlear implant, should the hearing loss be confirmed as profound and amplification found not to be beneficial, is crucial to avoid the complications that may arise with ossification of the cochlea.
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