Compensation for Off-Campus Practicum Supervisors Current Practices and Opinions The following article was presented at the ASHA 1999 Convention in San Francisco. Off-campus practicum experiences are an essential component in the preparation of new speech-language pathologists and audiologists. University programs in Communication Disorders need to maintain a network of off-campus sites in varied settings offering quality supervision and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2000
Compensation for Off-Campus Practicum Supervisors Current Practices and Opinions
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth E. Peaper
    University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2000
Compensation for Off-Campus Practicum Supervisors Current Practices and Opinions
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2000, Vol. 10, 25-28. doi:10.1044/aas10.3.25
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2000, Vol. 10, 25-28. doi:10.1044/aas10.3.25
The following article was presented at the ASHA 1999 Convention in San Francisco.
Off-campus practicum experiences are an essential component in the preparation of new speech-language pathologists and audiologists. University programs in Communication Disorders need to maintain a network of off-campus sites in varied settings offering quality supervision and learning experiences for students. Supervising students can be a professional growth opportunity for the supervisor, but it is also time consuming. Traditionally, off-campus supervisors have been very generous in giving their time and expertise to this endeavor.
Despite the willingness of experienced professionals to serve as off-campus practicum supervisors, academic programs face increased challenges in obtaining and maintaining an adequate network of off-campus clinical education opportunities. Enrollment in many academic programs has grown at the same time that working professionals are under pressure to increase productivity. Administrators in healthcare settings may question “non revenue generating time” that supervisors must spend with students for discussion of caseload issues and analysis of the student’s clinical performance. Large caseloads and case management responsibilities in some educational settings may cause potential supervisors to question their ability to assume an additional commitment such as student supervision and be able to do it well.
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