Outcomes Measurement and Management: The Evolution of Rehabilitation and Outcomes Measurement In Medical Speech-Language Much has been written in recent years regarding the impact of changes in the health care environment on speech-language pathology and other rehabilitation services (Fratttali, 1998; Warren, 1996; Hesketh & Sage, 1999). Clinicians are keenly aware that dramatic changes in the basic nature of health care delivery have had a ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2000
Outcomes Measurement and Management: The Evolution of Rehabilitation and Outcomes Measurement In Medical Speech-Language
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kevin P. Kearns
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Carmen D. Vega-BarachowitzColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Outcomes Measurement and Management
Article   |   October 01, 2000
Outcomes Measurement and Management: The Evolution of Rehabilitation and Outcomes Measurement In Medical Speech-Language
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2000, Vol. 10, 7-10. doi:10.1044/aas10.3.7
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2000, Vol. 10, 7-10. doi:10.1044/aas10.3.7
Much has been written in recent years regarding the impact of changes in the health care environment on speech-language pathology and other rehabilitation services (Fratttali, 1998; Warren, 1996; Hesketh & Sage, 1999). Clinicians are keenly aware that dramatic changes in the basic nature of health care delivery have had a significant impact on the types of neurogenic patients seen on their caseloads, the amount of time available to provide clinical services, and even the types of interventions that can be utilized. The adage “do more with less” is a constant refrain in acute care settings, rehabilitation hospitals, and skilled nursing facilities alike. The swiftness and severity of changes experienced in rehabilitation settings may leave clinicians with a sense of frustration, anxiety, and even despair. Clinicians express a sense of loss of control over their inability to provide clinical services in the manner that they feel is in their client’s best interest.
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