Technology: Clinical and Technological Innovations: Use of the Apple iPad in Clinical Supervision As clinical supervisors in speech-language pathology and audiology graduate programs, we must consider whether our feedback to graduate student clinicians in the clinical training program is relevant, evidence-based, and culturally sensitive. Clinical supervisors are currently faced with a generation of students who are attached to their mobile devices and crave ... Article
Article  |   October 2011
Technology: Clinical and Technological Innovations: Use of the Apple iPad in Clinical Supervision
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Corey L. Herd
    Radford University, Radford, VA
  • Rebecca Epperly
    Radford University, Radford, VA
  • Kenneth M. Cox
    Radford University, Radford, VA
  • Lauren SmithColumn Editor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Technology
Article   |   October 2011
Technology: Clinical and Technological Innovations: Use of the Apple iPad in Clinical Supervision
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2011, Vol. 21, 112-116. doi:10.1044/aas21.3.112
SIG 11 Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, October 2011, Vol. 21, 112-116. doi:10.1044/aas21.3.112

As clinical supervisors in speech-language pathology and audiology graduate programs, we must consider whether our feedback to graduate student clinicians in the clinical training program is relevant, evidence-based, and culturally sensitive. Clinical supervisors are currently faced with a generation of students who are attached to their mobile devices and crave instant gratification. The question we often forget to ask, however, is whether or not our mode of feedback accommodates students’ technology preferences. Researchers and clinical supervisors at Radford University (RU) investigated the role of technology in clinical supervision through the use of the Apple iPad. Within a single semester, graduate student clinicians in the RU Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic were provided with 6 weeks of clinical feedback presented via handwritten documentation. The student clinicians were then provided with written clinical feedback via the iPad for another 6 weeks. The student clinicians were surveyed regarding the effectiveness and efficiency of both methods of feedback. They were also asked to provide feedback regarding their preference(s) regarding the feedback formats. Based on the results of the surveys, students preferred the electronic mode of communication in regard to timeliness and clarity of clinical feedback but preferred the handwritten feedback when considering helpfulness and comfort levels. These results are discussed and implications for future clinical considerations are presented.

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